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Module

CAC1014 : Tragedy, Comedy, History: The World of Greek Literature

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Susanna Phillippo
  • Lecturer: Dr Claire Stocks, Professor Athanassios Vergados
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The aims of this module are:
1.To introduce students to the literary culture of Ancient Greece.
2. To train students in essential skills of literary analysis, and develop flexibility in the application of these skills to the details of a range of texts.
3. To introduce students to certain key issues of Ancient Greek society which are reflected in Greek literature.
4. To equip students to understand some of the connections between Greek literature and its social context.

Outline Of Syllabus

Around three representative works of Greek literature will be studied in detail, e.g. 5th C tragedy, 5th C comedy, 5th C prose history.
All texts are studied in translation. No previous knowledge of the Ancient World is required.

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials240:3012:00Asynchronous lecture material as delivered by staff.
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion501:0050:0036% of guided independent study
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials240:3012:00Lecture-linked prescribed Student activity associated with online lecture sessions.
Structured Guided LearningAcademic skills activities81:008:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading301:0030:0022% of guided independent study
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities81:008:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching41:004:00skills application and discussion session
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops61:006:00For the delivery of some subject content to the whole group allowing for interactive element.
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops61:006:00Guided interactive sessions; 2 as scheduled synchronous online discussion; 4 in other formats.
Structured Guided LearningStructured non-synchronous discussion51:005:00For Online discussion/Q&A sessions in some weeks; for guidance sessions in final teaching week.
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study571:0057:0042% of guided independent study.
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesModule talk21:002:00N/A
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The lectures [module talks, some of the workshops sessions and asynchronous lecture materials] (i) introduce students to skills involved in detailed study of classical texts; (ii) introduce some overall issues and themes regarding the study of Greek literature in relation to its social and historical context; (iii) look in more detail at representative works of Greek literature, exploring these both as literary creations and as reflections of their own time and world, and illustrating how skills of literary analysis may be applied to these.
Students develop skills in tackling these aspects for themselves by (i) preparing relevant tasks for group-work within lectures, seminars and workshops throughout the course, and participating in discussion at these sessions; (ii) preparing for the assessed assignment.
Note that the sessions defined as scheduled 'lectures' are envisaged as involving 'breakout room' student discussion of 15–20 minutes.
Many lectures involve the class dividing into sub-groups to discuss the texts; in seminars and workshops, the class will divide into smaller groups for more in-depth discussion and feedback on prepared aspects of the texts and on skills application, including practical sessions on 'visualisation' of texts.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay1M30Written assignment on text 1 (1000 words), due in the course of the semester
Essay1M702 part assignment on set texts 2 & 3. 2,500 words, due towards the end of Semester.
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Design/Creative proj1MPreparation for and participation in 'visualisation' activities for workshops etc., building up to assignments.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The assignment comprises 3 sections, each involving detailed analysis of a passage or passages from set texts.

The assignment is designed to test students’ ability to put into practice the skills of and approaches to literary analysis encountered in the module.

There is the opportunity for students to apply in these exercises either or both of: linguistic skills and approaches introduced in the module; knowledge of the classical tradition as relevant to the works studied.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable