Skip to main content

Module

POL2078 : Critical International Politics

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Laura Routley
  • Lecturer: Dr Kyle Grayson
  • Owning School: Geography, Politics & Sociology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The module is motivated by the critical ethos that “theory is always for someone and some purpose”.
The overall goal of the module is to introduce students to the cutting edge of research in the discipline of international politics in a way that compliments and expands on what is covered in other modules in the department. It also aims to develop students research skills to equip them for their research modules in the third year. The module explores the interplay between theory and practice and the diverse ways we can interrogate international politics. The module will introduce students to a diverse range of approaches to international politics that could include poststructuralism, postcolonialism, decolonialism, feminism, queer theory, and new materialism.

Outline Of Syllabus

Topics covered may include the following:
Race and racism in international politics, mobility and refugees, technology and warfare, how we can ‘sense’ international politics, emotions and the politics of the everyday, visual politics, the Anthropocene and climate change, the politics of sexuality, fictional international politics, the political significance of ‘things, objects and stuff’, decolonial approaches to international politics and non-Western theorising about international politics.

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion1137:00137:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials270:3013:30Non-synchronous; Recorded
Structured Guided LearningAcademic skills activities93:3031:30Annotated readings; online videos with added comments; reflective reading logs; dissertation prep.
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Synchronous; Present in person
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesScheduled on-line contact time91:009:00Synchronous; Q&A Feedback Hour with ML.
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The lectures introduce students to the key social, political, economic, and ideational contexts of international politics. In addition they serve to outline and illustrate the principle concepts and theories available to understanding these contexts.
The seminars will provide an environment in which these empirical, conceptual, and theoretical issues can be further explored and critically evaluated by students.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Research proposal2M15750 word research proposal with annotated bibliography
Research paper2M852750 word research essay
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The assessments will develop the student’s ability to critically and succinctly evaluate the ideas, concepts and theories introduced in lectures and explored in seminars. In addition the essay will also assess the capacity and initiative of students to undertake independent study through the prism of critical approaches to international politics.

The research proposal will provide students with the opportunity to develop their thinking towards the research essay and develop useful skills to prepare them for the dissertation i.e. defining a suitable research question; identifying appropriate literatures; structuring a proposal etc.

Components of the proposal include a rationale for the focus of the essay, a literature review, a description of the issue and theoretical perspectives they want to explore, and a small annotated bibliography. In the research essay students will build upon their proposal by putting into practice ideas form the module into their own specific area of interest.

Reading Lists

Timetable