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Module

POL1032 : Key Concepts in International Politics

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Simon Philpott
  • Owning School: Geography, Politics & Sociology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

• to introduce international relations as a discipline
• to examine the principal concepts in the study of international politics/international relations
• to locate these concepts in broad historical and philosophical contexts
• to analyse important issues in contemporary international politics
• to develop the analytical and critical skills of students

This module examines key concepts in the study of international politics. It explores a selection of issues that define the agenda of contemporary international politics including but not limited to: war; the state; power; humanitarian intervention; terrorism; territory and borders; culture and identity; media; religion; inequality; and global poverty. Through the analysis of these issues the course aims to introduce students to the concepts that define the agenda of international relations scholarship. The course then outlines the various perspectives adopted by scholars with respect to these conceptual questions. It aims to put the diverse understandings of actors, structures and processes into a broader historical and intellectual context.

Outline Of Syllabus

A thematic analysis of the issue agenda of international politics highlighting – through discussion of contemporary issues - key concepts such as states, borders, colonialism, imperialism, war, terror, security, gender, inequality, identity politics, religion.

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials181:0018:00Recorded, non-synchronous; personal capture (PCap) videos;
Structured Guided LearningAcademic skills activities93:0027:00Annotated readings; Personal capture (PCap) videos; quizzes; online videos with added comments etc.
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Synchronous (present in person for estates purposes for semester 2 only)
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study1137:00137:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesScheduled on-line contact time91:009:00Synchronous; Q&A Feedback Hour with ML
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Lectures introduce and explain key ideas, present different conceptual perspectives, and prompt student response.

Seminars provide forum for students to present, develop and discuss ideas, and reinforce their knowledge and understanding.

The feedback hour gives students the chance to drop in and ask questions about lectures, reading, and seminar discussion of the ML, who may also use the time to expand on recorded lectures and clarify key concepts. Structured, guided learning activities include quizzes to allow students to check their understandings of the meaning of life; personal capture videos and annotated readings to encourage deeper reflection on key concepts in 19th, 20th, and 21st century international politics.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M1003500 words
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Essays enable students to discuss an issue or problem in global politics at some length and in the context of a variety of academic texts and other sources. Questions will be crafted to ensure students have to draw upon content from across the module.

Reading Lists

Timetable